Ireland

Introduction to Ireland

Ireland is a small, independent country located in northwestern Europe. The country’s official name is the Republic of Ireland. Dublin is the capital and largest city. The country occupies about five-sixths of the island of Ireland. The remaining one-sixth of the island is occupied by Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

In Gaelic, the ancient language of Ireland, the country is called Eire (pronounced AIR uh). Gaelic and English are the country’s two official languages. Ireland also has long been known by the poetic name Erin. Ireland is also known as the Emerald Isle. It is called this because of its beautiful green countryside. Rolling farmlands, which are mainly pasture, cover much of the central part of the country, and mountains rise near the coasts.

Ireland is divided into 26 counties, and some of the counties are known for special features. For example, County Kerry is famous for its mountains and the scenic Lakes of Killarney. County Waterford is known for its delicate cut glass, and County Donegal is famous for its tweed cloth.

Many people consider the Irish to be exceptionally warm-hearted and friendly. The Irish also have a reputation for hospitality, close family ties, and skill as writers and storytellers.

The Irish have a long history that includes many hardships and struggles. In the 1840’s, a potato blight and the starvation and disease that followed caused the deaths of about a million people and at least as many people left their homeland. After this famine, a shortage of jobs and other problems caused emigration to continue. As a result, little more than half as many people live in Ireland today as lived there in 1845.

Ireland was under British rule for hundreds of years. Ireland gained its independence from Britain in 1921

Climate

The climate of Ireland can be summed up as being mild, moist and changeable with abundant rainfalland a lack of temperature extremes. It is defined as a temperate oceanic climate, or Cfb on the Köppen climate classification system, a classification it shares with most of northwest Europe.[1] The country receives generally warm summers and mild winters. It is considerably warmer than other areas on itslatitude, because it lies in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean, and as a result is warmed by the North Atlantic Current all year.

The influence of the North Atlantic Current also ensures the coastline of Ireland remains ice-free throughout the winter—unlike for example the Sea of Okhotsk and the Labrador Sea which are at a similar latitude. The climate in Ireland does not experience extreme weather, with tornadoes and similar weather features being rare.

Advantages of Study in Ireland

Ireland is a country steeped in tradition and history. Ireland’s long-standing tradition of providing exceptional education began with 6th century Irish scholar-monks, who travelled throughout Europe establishing centres of learning. Ireland’s long and honourable tradition in educational excellence is recognised the world over. Successive modern governments have continued to regard education as a key priority and investment in this area has been sustained for a long time. This has resulted in one of the highest education participation rates in the world today.

Ireland’s long and honourable tradition in educational excellence is recognised the world over. Dating back to the middle Ages, Ireland held the position as one of the principal education providers to the western world. Successive modern governments have continued to regard education as a key priority and investment in this area has been sustained for a long time. This has resulted in one of the highest education participation rates in the world today, which, in turn, has had positive implications for the strong economic growth and development of Ireland.

Education in Ireland

The levels of education in Ireland are primary, secondary and higher (often known as “third-level”) education. In recent years further education has grown immensely. Growth in the economy since the 1960s has driven much of the change in the education system. Education in Ireland is free at all levels, including college (university), but only for students applying from the European Union.[1] For universities there are student service fees (up to €3,000 in 2015),[2]which students are required to pay on registration, to cover examinations, insurance and registration costs.[3][4]

The Department of Education and Skills, under the control of the Minister for Education and Skills, is in overall control of policy, funding and direction, while other important organisations are the National Qualifications Authority of Ireland, the Higher Education Authority, and on a local level the Education and Training Boards are the only comprehensive system of government organisation. There are many other statutory and non-statutory bodies that have a function in the education system. The current Minister for Education is Jan O’Sullivan, a TD for the Limerick City constituency

Ireland Universities & Colleges

  1. Dublin International Study Centre
  2. Trinity College Dublin
  3. University College Dublin

Process:

a.      Select Course
b.      Select Institute
c.      Apply for Admission through GIEC Study Abroad
d.      Pay University Fee
e.      Process for Visa
f.       Receive Visa Decision

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