canada

Introduction to Canada

Canada, stretching from the U.S. in the south to the Arctic Circle in the north, is filled with vibrant cities including massive, multicultural Toronto; predominantly French-speaking Montréal and Québec City; Vancouver and Halifax on the Pacific and Atlantic coasts, respectively; and Ottawa, the capital. It’s also crossed by the Rocky Mountains and home to vast swaths of protected wilderness.

Climate

The average maximum/minimum temperatures of Canada of various cities across Canada, based on the climate period from 1981-2010 for the months of January and July (generally the lowest/highest average temperature months, but not in all cases).

The major Canadian city that falls outside the continental climate schema is Vancouver, which experiences an oceanic climate with a marked summer dry season. Of the eight largest Canadian cities, Ottawa, Montreal and Toronto have the warmest summers, Winnipeg the coldest winters, with Vancouver’s winters are far milder than any other large city in Canada.

Central and north Canada experiences subarctic and arctic climates, much of them arid. Those areas are not heavily populated due to the severe climate, where it does exceed -20° C on most winter days and has a very brief summer season.

The table can be reordered by clicking on the box in each column.

Advantages of Study in Canada

At the time of writing, the number of international students studying in Canada is over 250,000, a figure that is constantly growing. Many of these students are choosing Canada over other potential destinations, such as the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and France, because of certain advantages that studying in Canada can bring.
With quality and more affordable tuition, safe cities, employment options (both during and after the study period), and as a pathway to Canadian permanent residence, the decision to study in Canada can be one of the most important, and best, decisions made by young people from around the world.
World-class universities and colleges
Canadian universities and colleges located across the country are renowned for their research and innovation. Canada’s higher education institutions are diverse — varying in size, scope, character and breadth of programs. High academic standards and thorough quality controls mean that students may gain a high-quality education that will benefit their careers over the long term. A Canadian degree, diploma or certificate is generally recognized as being equivalent to those obtained from the United States or Commonwealth countries.
Lower tuition costs
Canada is often the preferred choice for students who may also have the option of studying in countries such as the United States or United Kingdom because of the lower tuition costs. Compared to other countries, Canadian international tuition fees, accommodation and other living expenses remain competitive.
Work while you study
Students in Canada have the advantage of being able to work while studying. Among other benefits, this allows them to manage their finances without incurring enormous debt. To gain the right to work off-campus, students must:
have a valid study permit;
be a full-time student;
be enrolled at a designated learning institution at the post-secondary level or, in Quebec, a vocational program at the secondary level; and
be studying in an academic, vocational or professional training program that leads to a degree, diploma or certificate that is at least six months in duration.
If a candidate qualifies, his or her study permit will allow him or her to:
work up to 20 hours per week during regular academic sessions; and
work full-time during scheduled breaks, such as the winter and summer holidays or spring break.
Post-graduate work permit
A typical path from student to permanent resident status in Canada is through taking advantage of something Canada offers that is not available, or more difficult to obtain, in other countries — a post-graduate work permit.
This work permit may be issued on completion of the study program for the duration that the program, up to a maximum of three years. Thus, a graduate who completed a four-year study program could be eligible for a three-year post-graduate work permit, while a graduate who completed a study program twelve months in duration could be eligible for a twelve-month post-graduate work permit.
A pathway to Canadian permanent residence
Skilled Canadian work experience gained through the Post-Graduate Work Permit Program helps graduates to qualify for permanent residence in Canada through the Canadian Experience Class (CEC).
Moreover, certain provinces, such as British Columbia and Quebec, have immigration streams that identify certain graduates for permanent residence. Candidates for British Columbia’s International Post-Graduate category have the advantage of not requiring a job offer and being able to have their application for permanent residence processed through the federal Express Entry immigration selection system. Students who graduate from a study program in Quebec may be eligible to apply for a Quebec Selection Certificate (Certificat de sélection du Québec, commonly known as a CSQ) through the Quebec Experience Class.
Canada wants students
“More than anything, Canada does not see international students as a source of income for privately-owned educational institutions, to be shown the door when they have completed their studies,” says Attorney David Cohen.
“On the contrary, Canada wants students because Canada is all about nation-building. Young, intelligent newcomers who have proven they have the credentials and means to assimilate are a big part of that. In short, Canada wants students to come here, study, contribute socially and economically, and stay permanently.”
– See more at: http://www.cicnews.com/2015/02/advantages-studying-canada-024500.html#sthash.CLJfg81i.dpuf

Education in Canada

Education in Canada is for the most part provided publicly, funded and overseen by federal, provincial, and local governments.[citation needed] Education is within provincial jurisdiction and the curriculum is overseen by the province.[15] Education in Canada is generally divided into primary education, followed by secondary education and post-secondary. Within the provinces under the ministry of education, there are district school boards administering the educational programs.[16] Education is compulsory up to the age of 16 in every province in Canada, except for Manitoba, Ontario and New Brunswick, where the compulsory age is 18, or as soon as a high school diploma has been achieved. In some provinces early leaving exemptions can be granted under certain circumstances at 14. Canada generally has 190 (180 in Quebec) school days in the year, officially starting from September (after Labour Day) to the end of June (usually the last Friday of the month, except in Quebec when it is just before June 24 – the provincial holiday).

Canada Universities & Colleges

  1. Arbutus College
  2. Royal Roads University- Study Group
  3. University Canada West

Process:

a.      Select Course
b.      Select Institute
c.      Apply for Admission through GIEC Study Abroad
d.      Pay University Fee
e.      Process for Visa
f.       Receive Visa Decision

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